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Report on Trip to Lira Uganda, May 2016 Dr Frankie Dormon

Report on our Trip to Lira Uganda, May 2016 Dr Frankie Dormon

Lira Uganda Objectives and Findings

web site – http://lirauni.ac.ug/

The visit was a short visit to touch base and reiterate our support.  It linked in with another trip to Madagascar to teach on the SAFE Paediatric Anaesthetic Course with Mercy Ships.

Objectives

 

  1. Establish a teaching programme for October
  2. Running 1-2 short courses at the University – AIM Neonatal Resus +/- South Sudanese
  3. Running an ICU training course at the hospital (1-2  hours per day)
  4. Presenting at the Grand Round
  5. Reasses accommodation and transport for October
  6. Establish further links with the church/SEED/RCPaeds
  7. Discuss future accommodation needs
  8. Obtain formal confirmation of University Status
  9. Obtain a curriculum for the University of Bournemouth

 

After several conversation with Anna Agnes,  Senior Midwifery Tutor,  we have agreed that we will have access to each year group as follows.

Yr 1. 2 Mornings per week.

They have only just started,  so talks should be very general.

Teaching to include Acute Illness Management,  Short lectures and scenarios.  Triage,  Resuscitation.

Neonatal Resuscitation

Communication and Teamwork.  

Nursing process/Importance of using initiative.  

 

Yr 2. 2 Afternoons per week.

Teaching to include Acute Illness Management,  Short lectures and scenarios.  Triage,  Resuscitation.

Neonatal Resuscitation

Communication and Teamwork.  

 

Yr 3. I full day per week.

Normal Midwifery,

Surgical And Anaesthetic Techniques,   

Theatre Safety

General Surgical Practice.

Modules from BASIC Intensive Care Course.

 

Yr 4 1 full day per week.

Complex Midwifery

Help with Project proposals writing.

Modules from SAFE Obstetric Anaesthesia and SAFE Paediatric Anaesthesia courses.

 

This leaves 1 day per week for flexibility. Possibly running 1-2 formal courses at the University – AIM Neonatal Resus +/- South Sudanese

 

  1. Running an ICU training course at the hospital (1-2  hours per day)

This suggestion was welcomed,  the Ministry of Health were unaware that the Intensive Care Facility was still not running due to lack of trained nurses.  This has become a top priority.  I spoke with Dr William,  Consultant Paediatrics,  he is hoping that we can run 1-2 hours of training at the hospital each day,  probably in the afternoon.  We have agreed to discuss a formal programme which will be advertised in advance of our arrival.  He will encourage both doctors and nurses to attend.   

  1. Presenting at the Grand Round.

I presented the Surgical Safety Check list during this visit,  which was very well received, although due to a national holiday,  there were only nurse attendees.  We will certainly present in October.

  1. Reasses accommodation and transport for October

We visited several hotels and looked into rented accommodation.  Our experience with staying in a house, was that organising food was challenging,  the amount of work that the team are expected to do,  would make self catering impractable.  I recommend that we should stay at Kanberra again.  They will be contacting me to discuss favourable rates.  We should eat out a couple of nights per week.  

  1. Establish further links with the church/SEED/RCPaeds

I worked closely with two doctors who have been sent out by RCPaeds, we also spent time with the Lecturers from SEED.  These are all contacts which we shall develop further.  IN addition I met a Consultant in Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Bridget Hurry,  who runs an orphanage and 3 schools, through PATH Ministries,  supported by her husband Steve and their two children.  They have a small guesthouse, which would not be big enough for us,  but they also run a restaurant which I think we should visit. I would also like each team member to have the opportunity to visit the orphanage during their trip.    

  1. Discuss future accommodation needs.

Houses are available for longer visits,  but catering would be a challenge.

  1. Obtain formal confirmation of University Status

Prof Jasper has promised to send the details. The University has a web site and is fully separated from Gulu University.  The first group of students is due to qualify next June.  On each visit I have seen an active faculty of tutors with secretarial support.   Jamie was given the opportunity to meet with the accountant and back room staff and had some access to the University accounts.   

  1. Obtain a curriculum for the University of Bournemouth.

Now on file.

 

Overall we were very pleased with our achievements.  We managed to cover most of our objectives, and provided further discussions are successful over the summer I am confident that our next visit will be highly beneficial.

Regarding training for South Sudan,  there is significant work being done to develop Post Graduate training in South Sudan,  there is unlikely to be strong support from the PGME group in Juba, as their efforts are all concentrated in Juba.  However,  the political situation is changing daily and offering training in Uganda remains an option.

 

During the summer  any potential opportunities will be explored.

The Maternity hospital is due to open on July 1st,  which will give us the ideal opportunity to help develop systems and protocols and embed safe practice for all the students.  Our welcome was so friendly that I do not envisage there will be resistance to sensible suggestions for running the unit.  In addition the foundations for the main hospital are being dug,  with a 14 month time frame.  I would not expect that time frame to be met,  as the foundations are being dug by hand,  but there was great progress,  with infrastructure (improved roads, water accommodation for students, and Internet) being developed alongside the actual hospital buildings.

Our accommodation was adequate,  but Cherie Clarke,  our contact had returned to America for a family crisis,  we had her Uganda help staying at the house but catering was limited and we tended to fend for ourselves.  It was an experience to shop and cook,  but also time consuming.  

Arnold, our driver, once again delivered us safely to Lira,  took us everywhere that we wanted to go and got us back to the airport.  The importance of a safe good driver was very evident on our return journey,  when we saw a very recently overturned petrol tanker and separately, a near accident with a lorry of cows and about 20 people.   Arnold is trained in combat driving, which gives us added safety.

I recommend that we should use him again in October, particularly as there will be several transfers between Lira and Entebbe.  The advantages of coming into Entebbe in the morning are such that we reached Lira before dark,  on the same day.  In addition we drove back to Entebbe on the day of departure,  avoiding the more expensive hotels around Kampala.

In summary this was a short but productive visit.  I see no reason why there should not be clinical visits in the spring in future,  although formal lecture room teaching may be limited,  there are plenty of opportunities to train and support within the hospital environment and to plan the teaching trip for the following October.

 

Dr Frankie Dormon

Medical Lead for Poole Africa Link.     



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